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Here you will find my collection of accurate and detailed transcriptions as Guitar tabs + Piano sheets + Bass tabs with Chords and Lyrics that will teach how to Play Like The Greats.

"Como Practicar Escalas" (YouTube clip) || Guitar: Tab + Sheet Music

Julian Lage

"Como Practicar Escalas" (YouTube clip) || Guitar: Tab + Sheet Music

"Como Practicar Escalas" (Youtube clip) || Guitar: Tabs + Sheet Music
"Como Practicar Escalas" (Youtube clip) || Guitar: Tabs + Sheet Music

"Como Practicar Escalas" (YouTube clip) || Guitar: Tab + Sheet Music

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• Jazz Guitar: tabs + sheet music/score
• Digital Audio files: midi + xml + mp3


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artist: Julian Lage
clip: Cómo Practicar Escalas (YouTube clip)

This is a transcription of the YouTube clip, titled "Como Practicar Escalas (Julian Lage)" (see the video), which means "How to Practice Scales" in Spanish.

As the title suggests, this clip is about how to approach practicing scales: Julian Lage demonstrates first a standard linear approach to playing scales, and then how to practice scales "in random orders", meaning a very free and exploratory approach, which more resembles music. (The name he quotes here is Gary Burton, a jazz vibraphonist, teacher and mentor at the Berklee College of Music.)
This transcription is a very inspiring little demonstration of how to go about practicing scales in a more musical way. The key insight here is that practicing scales need not necessarily be a mechanical exercise distinct from real music. As Julian puts it, "Ideally, in your lifetime, you blur the line, so that what you work on is of interest for people to hear". Indeed, this is little improvisation over a simple F major scale is of musical interest, I hope, for you to hear.

This clip is part of a recording of this Julian Lage workshop from 2010 (uploaded in 2016), which I encourage you to watch.